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ANAPHORA the elements: earth - Art exhibition

The exhibition and the art space

From the 23rd of December (8pm) until the 29th of January you will be able to find a very intriguing exhibition "ANAPHORA the elements: earth" at the Albert van Abbehuis. The exhibition is lead by nature in its core.
The Albert van Abbehuis is a small art space in the center of Eindhoven, opposite the Van Abbe Museum. It enables artists who are living in Eindhoven to receive a spotlight and creates inspiring exhibitions which transform the house itself every time.

Roos Vogels

"Faced with the prospect of our society destroying its natural resources, the 'romantic' idea of reconciliation with nature takes on new meaning for me. But it is the urge to understand nature, that miracle, that I want to communicate to the public."

Roos owes her love for nature to her family. They introduced her to diverse landscapes around the world at a very young age. In 2019, she received her BA from the AKV|St. Joost art academy in 's-Hertogenbosch. She presented her final work Traces of Time's Passage at the Launch exhibition. She was nominated for the SBK Sprouts Young Talent Award and the SBK-Otto Hetterscheid Stimulation Prize for her work there.

After the academy, she participated as an Apprentice in the Apprentice Master Project of Kunstpodium T and as one of the participants of Inversion Talenthub Brabant. She received several achievements in the meantime. And she continues her practice from her studio at the Temporary Art Centre in Eindhoven and collaborates with several (international) artists.

 

In the leaflet of the exhibition Rob Schoonen describes her work the following:

"Not without nature

The sublime, that's what Roos Vogels is looking for. No more and especially no less. And that sublime, that can be nothing else for her than nature. She studied it extensively, starting during her time at the academy, in both art history and philosophy. The outcome of her study was that nature - in the broadest sense of the word - comes closest to that which cannot be surpassed.

Roos has her roots in nature. She has seen many landscapes at a young age, during holidays with her brother and parents. And it was she who then took twigs, mushrooms and leaves with her. A pine nut brought along grew into a two meter high tree in the garden at home.

The second time she comes into contact with the phenomenon of nature is at the academy, working with themes such as death and decay. Very attracted to things she couldn't really put her finger on; intangible things. Like death. Her studio was full of dead flowers, and paintings were made of them. Until a teacher remarks that, according to him, Roos didn't see death so gloomy at all. More poetic, was the word that came up in that conversation.

It turned out to be a tipping point, because the next work to be made was a video of a highly sensory space. It represented rebirth. Then followed the study of the sublime. She cannot define that sublime. It is a feeling, an experience. This she thought to have found in a primeval forest in Poland, but a year later the feeling in Japan came much closer to it.

Then the spatial works with the twigs arose. Branches and twigs are tied together and the material is leading; never force anything, is the adage. Roos feels at home, working with those branches, but also when she makes drawings of trees with graphite - of course graphite. She falls for the drawing of it; the structure of the bark, especially the wounds, the deviations, the irregularities with all those curved lines and surfaces. Those she wants to highlight. Literally, therefore also graphite on graphite; then you can play nicely with light.

People sometimes see the strangest things in her drawings and she's totally okay with that. Nor does it have to be clear in a nanosecond that it concerns trees. She herself sees a raging sea in one of her latest drawings; also fine. No, she absolutely cannot imagine making work that is not somehow connected to nature. Because it pretty much flows through her veins."

Rob Schoonen November 2022



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